How a Statement Ceiling Can Top Off a Room’s Style

BY NANCY MATTIA ON APRIL 12TH, 2019

How a Statement Ceiling Can Top Off a Room’s Style

BY NANCY MATTIA ON APRIL 12TH, 2019

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In the past, the ceilings at most homes have faded into the background, while the four walls have gotten all the attention. But now things have been looking up as some homeowners are including ceilings in their renovation plans – some are going so far as to make it a room’s focal point. They might paint it in an eye-popping color or add beams to give it dimension –something to provide a little or a lot of oomph.

While a statement ceiling works in just about any room, it’ll have its greatest impact on a room that’s well-traveled. “You want people to see it,” says Abbie Jacobson, a Chicago interior designer (abbiejacobson.com). She suggests doing a guest room, entryway, kitchen or living room. “Or do a bathroom. They can be boring, so creating a statement ceiling will make it fun.” If you’re intrigued by a ceiling’s potential as a decorative element, read on.

1. Painting a masterpiece.

Applying a few gallons of color to a ceiling is the easiest way to give it visual impact. “Keep the walls neutral and use a bright color on the ceiling to make it pop,” says Jacobson. “Or do contrasting colors, such as a light blue on the walls and a darker blue on the ceiling.” Pick hues from a room’s existing décor (rug, comforter, drapes) for cohesiveness. Two trends to consider: painting a ceiling black or doing stripes (if the room has striped curtains, match them!).

2. Making the most of texture.

If you don’t want a flat look, you could install vintage (or vintage-looking) tin ceiling tiles. Buy them new or from a salvage store and consider painting them to add charm to a kitchen or living room. Other elements that create texture: molding, hand-painted silver-leaf or gold-leaf, draped linen, grasscloth, flocked wall paper with velvet details, stenciled plaster images of birds and flowers, wood paneling using different woods at different angles.

3. Going three-dimensional.

For a dramatic effect, install a series of wood beams, either in a uniform pattern for an architectural look or more abstractly. Keep the wood natural or paint it– whichever goes best with the style of your house.

4. Getting artistic.

Think Michelangelo (or hire a pro) to create hand-painted images on a ceiling. “You could do a solar system for a kid’s room or geometric shapes for a kitchen,” says Jacobson. Or go with flowers and butterflies in a bathroom. If you’re super motivated, paint a mural!

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